Rethinking Goliath

What if we’ve been wrong about David and Goliath this whole time?

This is the question posed by Malcolm Gladwell at the center of his new book David and Goliath. Gladwell is the revolutionary brain behind The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers – 3 books which revolutionized the business world and my personal thinking as well.

Gladwell’s books consistently offer fresh perspective on seemingly obvious thoughts we take for granted about success. In David and Goliath, Gladwell asks us to rethink the idea of underdogs – the heroes who seemingly overcome great adversity to triumph in battle. Gladwell posits that perhaps some disadvantages are really advantages (and vice versa).

The book starts off with a reexamination of the first and greatest underdog story ever recorded – David vs. Goliath. As we all once learned in Sunday School, David was the meager shepherd who, forsaking a warrior’s armor, brought only a slingshot to take down a mighty giant.

Generations have been taught this story as an example of the power of God to use the smallest of men to slay the tallest of enemies. But what if David wasn’t the underdog here? What if David was actually the prohibitive favorite against Goliath?

Gladwell’s research shows David was not an underdog at all. He was actually a strategic mastermind. Continue reading

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Relearning To Fly

If you can’t fly then run. If you can’t run then walk. If you can’t walk then crawl. But whatever you do you have to keep moving forward. – Martin Luther King, Jr. 

photo-2Have you ever flown before? Not literally in an airplane. I’m talking about the sensation that comes when you’re gliding through life, when joy comes effortlessly, when you feel as if you’re floating off the ground. 

When I go out for a run and I really get in the groove, that’s when I feel like I’m flying.

Once upon a time I ran a half marathon. Way back in 2011 I sweated my way across the finish line of the Greenwood, SC Half Marathon in a half-decent time of 2:12:36.

I couldn’t believe it. I would have been happy to finish under the 3 hour mark.

For years I wavered on whether or not I was capable of doing a 13.1 mile run. I trained on and off, never really breaking an 8 mile run at the most.

Finally I made a pact with a few students of mine. We decided we would do this together.

The feeling on the other side of the finish line was elation. I could not believe I had really completed the race. I had immediate plans to get back into training for the next one.

It’s over 2 years later and I still haven’t run the sequel. Continue reading